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Goat Marrige calls from boys on twitter!

goat An alarming number of people have been posting on twitter about relationships with goats. Perhaps it is time for the law to be revised to open up marriage between the boys and the goats. It is in the interest of equal opportunities and equal rights of course!

In all seriousness hoewver, it turns out that Twitter is facing the second worm in the space of a week. It highlights the potential security issues associated with using Twitter, again. The users seem like they are not going to learn.

This time it was caused by basically the same flaw as the previous one with much the same effect. However this time the resulting messages seem to be all more or less the same content. The users of the site have realised they have been accidental posting humiliating content about their relationships with goats.

Given the nature of this threat and the similarity to the previous attack I wonder if this has been generated by the same hacker. Instead of merely hovering over the link this time you had to actually click on the link. The security aspects of preventing it need to be seriously considered by Twitter as part of a solid security review, and the sooner they start the better.

References
TechWatch

Categories
Technology

BBC Reporter seals mobile data

The BBC freshly out of criticism over both the value of the tv license and the loss of significant quantities of equipment by incompetent staff have released an article on how easy it is to hack mobile phones. The topic may be exaggerated, as the reporter was doing it for journalistic purposes.

However the worry is that if a member of staff of the BBC can easily setup an ‘app’ that can log sensitive information to a third party, what could someone whom has a real malicious intent achieve?

It highlights the importance of app stores such as Google and Apple to act as a first line of security against malicious criminals. Both of these have recently removed apps which they believe had a malicious intent behind them.

They may see it as a much more lucrative revenue stream as they can setup premium rate numbers and have your phone silently call that number for ours on end and you wont find out about it until your monthly bill comes in. At that, it presumes you even look at your monthly bill, many providers are using online bills so unless you log in, you may not realise the problem until your direct debit fails.

References
BBC News
BBC News